Friday, March 29, 2013

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

J.J. Johnson - Autumn Leaves

the musician : J.J. Johnson
the tune : Autumn Leaves
the artist : Serge Dehaes

Monday, March 25, 2013

John Coltrane - Stardust

the musician : John Coltrane
the tune : Stardust
the artist : Charlene Chua

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Django Reinhardt - After You've Gone

the musician : Django Reinhardt
the tune : After You've Gone
the artist : Julien Decaudin

Some of you might remember another Django portrait of Julien. This one is intended as a follow-up to the first one and I'll let Julien explain how they are linked:

"The starting idea was to play on Django’s music legacy, how it still inspires thousands of people (and animals) all over the world, which sometime feels like if Django was still alive. Then, I’m still thinking Django was not only one of the great guitarist but a well respected fisherman too.

This time my own Django’s logic has been pushed further with some pretty damn good fishing versatility to pick up clouds that could interrupt people playing Gypsy Jazz in parks, and free distribution of amazing French baguettes that could eventually interrupt people playing but only for a mandatory tasty break. Thank you Django, and I hope to see your skills soon playing well on the lovely green Welsh hills."

Thanks for sharing Julien!

Monday, March 18, 2013

Milt Jackson - Lament

the musician : Milt Jackson
the tune : Lament
the artist : Horacio Cacciabue

Friday, March 15, 2013

Ma Rainey - Booze And Blues

the musician : Ma Rainey
the tune : Booze And Blues
the artist : Tete Chumi

Thursday, March 14, 2013

Aka Moon & DJ Grazzhoppa DJ big band

the musician : Aka Moon & DJ Grazzhoppa
the tune : Live exhibition
the artist : Philippe Debongnie

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Sunday, March 10, 2013

Interview - Ben Prestage

the musician : Ben Prestage
the tune : A love song
the artist : Tom LaBaff

To start the week, I am very happy to share Ben's music, his music is more bluesy than jazzy but good music always makes it on the jazz and draw blog. Tom sent us this excellent portrait of him, he also sent us the following interview, some good reading to start the week:  

Q. I've seen you play live in downtown Vero where I noticed people practically crawl out of the manholes to hear you play. What makes your live performances so mesmerizing?
A. I think it's a combination of things. Some people come to hear the finger-style guitar playing, some come to listen to the lyrics, others come to dance, and some show up just for the novelty of one guy playing guitar, bass, drums, and harmonica at the same time. It's a unique show. Even if you've seen one-man-bands before, you probably haven't seen one quite like this.  

Q. Did you sell your soul to the devil?
A. No, I haven't even met him... yet.  

Q. You grew up on the rim of the Everglades, 7 miles from any paved roads. Ever have any close calls with the wildlife out there?
A. We had gators and cottonmouths in the pond on our property, but I never felt in danger. Once when I was a kid, our neighbor's Doberman saw just the head of a good-sized gator in a canal and jumped in to get it. The dog didn't realize there was more than just the head in the water and he got bit in the chest! (He did survive.)

Q. In the past you've placed 2nd, 3rd, and 4th at the famous International Blues Challenge in Memphis. When are you going back to claim 1st place?
A. I probably won't go back to compete, because I have been so busy touring. I would like to go back as a spectator, though. There are so many great bands from all over the world, and when you are competing, it's hard to take it all in. The International Blues Challenge is "the largest gathering of Blues bands in the world," and every continent, excluding Antarctica, is represented. All of the bands compete at a local level before they even get the chance to go to Memphis, so most of the bands are great.  

Q. When you create an original song does it stem from a desire to make a statement or maybe to challenge yourself artistically?
A. It depends on the song. Some of my songs are born from the desire to express a personal ideology, some are purely aesthetic, a few are abstract, and others are strictly intended to induce laughter. I can't stay with just one formula when writing.  

Q. Do you start with lyrics first then find the tune or visa versa?
A. Sometimes I'll have some idea that I want to express through words, so I'll write the lyrics first. Then I have to come up with music that complements the mood of the lyrics. As, I write the music to fit the words, I will often come up with variations in rhythm patterns or rhyme schemes for the same set of lyrics. The music and the words will evolve together as the song takes shape. Other times I will come up with the music first. In that case, I will listen to myself play the piece over and over until I visualize what the song is going to be about.  

Q. Loved your performance of "A Love Song" at the live Alachua celebration. (Don't worry I won't ask you what warm peach pie means). Do you have a song that was inspired by a true heart-wrenching break-up?
A. I have never written a "serious" love song. I usually will tell the audience, "Okay, now I'm going to play a love song." Then I'll sing either a murder ballad or a song about someone giving their wife a wig for Christmas. The song you mentioned about the "warm peach pie" was written by my friend Brian Martin from Arkansas.  

Q. You seem perfectly content as a one-man-band. Have you ever been part of a group?
A. I have been in bands before, but I prefer the one-man-band format. I think it is a musical medium that hasn't been fully explored.  

Q. Ever think of shaving the beard?
A. I shaved it once, and thought "why did I do that?"  

Q. What's your experience with music producers? Do you have a manager?
 A. I produce my own music and have never worked with another producer. I manage (and sometimes mismanage) myself as well, but I do have a US booking agent: Harty Wiedemann, Blues Pros Talent; and a European booking agent: Rob Koning, King Bee Booking Agency. They help set up live performances and deal with the promoters so I can concentrate on writing, performing, and recording.  

Q. You perform at venues all over including North Africa. How does that audience react differently than U.S. audiences?
A. People are the same no matter where you go. Some people love my music and a few can't stand it anywhere I've been. I've had great audiences in the US, Europe, and N. Africa. Blues and American Roots music are both based on ancient European and African music and have become the foundation for every type of Popular Music around the world. When an artist performs American Roots Music or Blues with passion, he or she will be accepted by most audiences around the world.  

Q. Did you witness any political hostility over there?
 A. I didn't see any. The culture is different over there, but everyone I met was nice enough. The Moroccans that I met said they were happier with their new king than they were with the last one, so I guess it's all relative.  

Q. Do you have formal training? Who got you started?
A. I was in band in school. Paul Destito the band director at Indiantown Middle School got me started on trumpet and my band director at South Fork High School, Joe Flanagan kept me going. I taught myself guitar when I was about 13 or 14 and have been playing ever since!  

Q. Whiskey or wine?
A. Whiskey, or beer, or wine, in that order... but not if I have to drive that night! Thanks Tom for sharing this with us!

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Wednesday, March 6, 2013

Bugge Wesseltoft - Hands

the musician : Bugge Wesseltoft
the tune : Hands
the artist : Anne Lück

I can not believe I have not had the opportunity to post about Bugge Wesseltoft before. Funny thing I did not realize this untill now...

Very happy to share his work, his and Anne's. Thank you for this opportunity Anne.

Monday, March 4, 2013

Esperanza Spalding - tell him

the musician : Esperanza Spalding
the tune : tell him
the artist : Ira Sluyterman v. L.

Friday, March 1, 2013